Historický ústav akademie věd České republiky, v. v. i.

MODERNÍ DĚJINY
roč. 17, 2009, č. 2, 192 s.



OBSAH • CONTENT


STUDIE • STUDIES


Josef HARNA
Vavro Šrobár a jeho podíl na vzniku agrární strany na Slovensku (1918–1922)
[Vavro Šrobár and his role in the foundation of the Agrarian Party in Slovakia]
s. 1–22

Petr ANEV
Národní strana práce na stránkách Lidových novin a Přítomnosti (1925–1930). Politická orientace Ferdinanda Peroutky, Karla Čapka a dalších osobností spojených s Národní stranou práce
[National Labor Party on the pages of Lidové noviny and Přítomnost periodicals (1925–1930). Political orientation of Ferdinand Peroutka, Karel Čapek and other persons linked with the National Labor Party]
s. 23–63

David PAVLÁT
Novinářská a politická dráha Huberta Ripky do vyvrcholení mnichovské krize na počátku října 1938 a jeho odchodu do exilu
[Hubert Ripka’s career as a journalist and politician until the culmination of the Munich Crisis early in October 1938 and his emigration]
s. 65–129


MATERIÁLY • MATERIALS



Jindřich DEJMEK
Svědectví Arnošta Heidricha o československé diplomacii a sovětské politice z konce roku 1948
[Arnošt Heidrich’s testimony on Czechoslovak diplomacy and Soviet policy late in 1948]
s. 131–178


KRONIKA • CHRONICLE


Redakce a Vědecká rada časopisu Moderní dějiny
Vzpomínka na prof. PhDr. Jana Kuklíka, CSc. (23. června 1940 – 22. srpna 2009)
[The Memory for  prof. Jan Kuklík (June 23, 1940 – August 22, 2009)]
s. 179

Petr PROKŠ
Prezentace prvního dílu edice Zápisy ze schůzí československé vlády v Londýně (1941–1945)
[Presentation of Part I of Zápisy ze schůzí československé vlády v Londýně (Minutes of the Czechoslovak Government meetings in London)]
s. 180–181


RECENZE • REVIEWS

Jana BUREŠOVÁ – Miloš TRAPL, Bohumil Laušman. Proměny života sociálně demokratického politika s nástupem komunistické moci v Československu, Olomouc 2009, 124 s. ISBN 978-80-244-2247-3
(Josef Harna)
s. 183–185

Bohuslav LITERA, Historie Rudé armády 1917–1941. I. a II. díl, Praha, Nakladatelství Libri 2009, 187 s., 190 s. ISBN 978-80-7277-418-0; ISBN 978-80-7277-419-7 (soubor)
(Petr Prokš)
s. 185–188


SUMMARY



Josef HARNA
Vavro Šrobár and his role in the foundation of the Agrarian Party in Slovakia

Vavro Šrobár entered politics as early as the turn of the 19th century hoping to contribute to an overall advancement of the Slovak nation oppressed in the Hungarian part of Austro-Hungary. He saw a solution to that situation in close contacts between Czechs and Slovaks; therefore, he supported the concept of one common „Czechoslovak“ nation. His political career culminated in the early period of existence of the Czechoslovak Republic. He was then a member of several governments of the new country. As a minister endowed with full administration powers over Slovakia he largely helped incorporate its territory into the Czechoslovak Republic. From the very beginning, however, his concepts were in conflict with those of Milan Hodža, another founder and leader of the Slovak agrarian movement. By 1921, both of them had succeeded in creating two organizations advocating the interests of Slovak peasants. In 1922, the two parties merged with the Agrarian Party, initially Czech, thus creating the nationwide Republican Party of Agrarians and Small Peasants, which was one of the main supports of the parliamentary democratic system in Czechoslovakia until the end of the First Republic.
Key words: 20th century history; Czechoslovakia; politics

Petr ANEV
National Labor Party on the pages of Lidové noviny and Přítomnost periodicals (1925–1930). Political orientation of Ferdinand Peroutka, Karel Čapek and other persons linked with the National Labor Party

The intellectual weekly Přítomnost and the still existing newspaper Lidové noviny represented an important part of Czechoslovakia’s press media between the two world wars. The orientation of the two periodicals was shared by important intellectuals, such as the important journalist Ferdinand Peroutka, renowned writer Karel Čapek, and others. These periodicals and their editors, journalists and correspondents were closely linked to a small intellectual organization, the National Labor Party, existing in the years 1925–1930. The Party was considered the most important supporter of the political group known as „The Castle“, which was a generally accepted term for the political group headed by President T. G. Masaryk and Foreign Minister Edvard Beneš. The National Labor Party can be regarded as an indirect successor to the Realistic Party from the period of Austro-Hungary headed by Masaryk. Most of the Labor Party Members were initially members of the National Democratic Party where they formed an internal opposition fraction, but they left that party in 1925 to create the National Labor Party which, however, failed to enjoy a broader support among the population. Therefore, they concentrated on polemics in the press and on exposing various scandals and affairs. Finally, in 1930, the party merged with the National Socialist Party. In spite of its short history it constitutes an integral part of the democratic left-oriented political traditions of Czechoslovakia between the two world wars.
Key words: 20th century history; Czechoslovakia; Politics

David PAVLÁT
Hubert Ripka’s career as a journalist and politician until the culmination of the Munich Crisis early in October 1938 and his emigration

Hubert Ripka (1895–1958) ranked among the most active democratically oriented journalists in the First Czechoslovak Republic. Follower of President T. G. Masaryk and close collaborator of Foreign Minister and later President Edvard Beneš, he wrote for a wide range of democratic periodicals in support of the „Castle Group“ policy. He advocated the democratic principles and the international orientation of Czechoslovakia, seeking as much support as possible for the Little Entente alliance, particularly in connection with the growing threat from Nazi Germany. Of great importance were Ripka’s personal contacts with German „neo-activists“ in the ČSR, with opposition circles in Nazi Germany, as well as with French and British opponents of the appeasement policy. He strongly opposed the Munich Agreement; therefore, he left the country in October 1938 to join the Czechoslovak resistance movement abroad.
Key words: History; Czechoslovakia’s foreign policy; Munich Agreement

Jindřich DEJMEK
Arnošt Heidrich’s testimony on Czechoslovak diplomacy and Soviet policy late in 1948

Arnošt Heidrich, an important Czechoslovak diplomat and General Secretary of the Czechoslovak Ministry of Foreign Affairs, was largely involved in the formulation of Czechoslovakia’s foreign policy in the years 1945–1948. In November 1948, he fled to the USA where he wrote a comprehensive memorandum for the U.S. Government on the practices of some components of the state apparatus in Czechoslovakia, already fully controlled by Communists. His memorandum, which is published here with explaining notes, informed the readers about the leading representatives of the regime and its diplomacy, and also about its foreign political goals. It also contained additional evidence concerning the role of the Soviet Union in the Communist coup d’état of 1948 and about other mechanisms through which Czechoslovakia was subjected to Moscow’s political and economic goals.
Key words: Czechoslovak foreign policy 1948; Czechoslovak diplomacy and diplomats 1948; Communist coup d’état in ČSR in 1948; Soviet foreign policy and its aims in the initial phase of the Cold War

ISSN 1210-6860